Closed Poll: Future Fairphone OS Development

Only Free Software is really fair. The efforts should alway go in this direction.

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I agree only if we mean free as in speech and not as in beer :wink: developer need something to eat and drink after their efforts :wink:
Bye! :smile:

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Well… I do not agree.
A fair software include a fair payment to the developer.

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Hello,

FP already release the kernel code! the problematic area is everything else!

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Hi @Freedim. you are quite close ! There is currently indeed a strong coupling between hardware and the software (way stronger than on the Intel platform). ARM only specifies the CPU and buses . Most of the rest (Interrupt handlers , IO , GPU , GPIO, I2C , video driver etc) gets merged on the system on chip and gets accessed via direct memory access (e.g. no self describing PCI bus).

If we look at the mobile market the story is a little more complex because the system on chip vendors also provide the modem (baseband) functionality that not running on the main ARM core but is needed to make a phone call.

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If Firefox OS will be supported, i won’t hesitate for a second to buy a Fairphone.

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Yes, that’s exactly what I meant.

Dear Fairphone Team.
Firefox OS is the essental ingredient for buying the phone. Android OS or mods of it are not the way I would go as the next mobile phone. Looking forward to the ongoing.

Although I would love to see a Firefox OS Fairphone, Fairphone shouldn’t be a niche phone. It’s probably better to give the user a choice; currently the Geeksphone Revolution is capable of running Android and FirefoxOS and in the future the Alcatel One Pixi will be capable of running Android, Firefox OS, and Windows Phone. I think Fairphone should take the same route.

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Small detail though: with the Pixi you choose an OS and are stuck with it because the hardware is tailored for the OS.

Hello!!

I have chose the second option because I’d like to use the Windows Phone OS in my future FairPhone; will be possible? :slight_smile:

@balarma the second option is about an open source Operating System wich Windows Phone is not.

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Hi thanks for backing me. You are correct that Replicant is a fully free operating system. I used the term “open source” as it is a term that more people are familiar. I would say that Replicant is both “free” AND “open source”. I view open source as a subset of free software.

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2, I’ve always hoped that FP would fully or primarily support CM, but beware the CM / Oxygen / India problem if you are hoping to sell there.
Perhaps just supporting/shipping with the Vanilla Android will work around that.

Cheers.

Strong recommendation from me: for success of FP2 would be to do everything necessary to get FP2 on this: Cyanogen Installer compatibility list. I’ve just upgraded an SGS2 and SGS4 to CM11 Android 4.4.4. using the new installer. That is how a non-OTA update should work.

As general feedback 4.4.4 runs great on the SGS2, not bad for a 4 year old phone, so a good indicator that the FP vision can deliver on longevity if you can get over the Mediatek issue.

Cheers.

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After all I’ve seen Sailfish OS would be a great thing if it is completely opened.

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I think it’s the other way around: (truly) ‘Free software’ (in the sense of the free software foundation (http://fsf.org)) is a very important subset of open source.

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Actually neither is a subset of the other, open source is a movement that origined from the free software movement.

From Wikipedia’s Article on Open Source

The term “open source” was first proposed by a group of people in the free software movement who were critical of the political agenda and moral philosophy implied in the term “free software” and sought to reframe the discourse to reflect a more commercially-minded position. […] Peterson suggested “open source” at a meeting held at Palo Alto, California, in reaction to Netscape’s announcement in January 1998 of a source code release for Navigator. […] Richard Stallman, the founder of the free software movement, initially seemed to adopt the term, but later changed his mind.

I also like to refer to Richard Stallman’s Article: Why Open Source Misses the Point of Free Software

EDIT: Sorry, if you are not talking abot the movements but of the sets of software projects per se, then in fact free software is a subset of open source software because all free software projects meet all guidelines for open source software but not the other way around.

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I moved 2 posts to an existing topic: Poll: If you could install any mobile operating system