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Availability of FP3 batteries?

Tags: #<Tag:0x00007f05e6050300> #<Tag:0x00007f05e60500f8>

Has there been an anouncement when FP3 batteries will be available in the shop?
I like to have a spare battery in my wallet for emergencies, and used it frequently with my last phone.

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No news that I’m aware of. But from my experience of my FP3, I could get 2 days use out of it compared to about half a day with the FP2. Plus QC 3 means even half an hour of charging gets you a lot of extra juice

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FYI: That’s a bad idea.

The battery percentage display depends on the phone’s familiarity with the battery. If you regularly exchange the battery you won’t be able to trust the displayed battery percentage anymore and it may drop from anywhere to 0% within seconds, the phone which is not only inconvenient, but also bad for the battery in the long run.
Generally it’s best to keep the battery percentage within 60% and 80% as much as possible for the battery’s health, but that’s hard if you don’t know the real battery percentage.

A power bank is a better idea.

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Really?
That’s a rather narrow margin.
In the Maintenance Tips of the #batteryguide it’s 40 to 80% and on other places in the forum I guess, I remember to have read about 20 to 80% . And even that I find rather complicated to achieve.

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Oops yeah, 40-80% is more like it.

I don’t think it’s very complicated. I charge my FP2 to 80% max and usually don’t drop below 40% after one day of normal usage.

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Thanks for your advice.
Using a power bank or keeping the charge between 40 and 80% is just not practicable in my situation.
The ability to switch between two batteries was a main reason for me to get an FP3.
But I don’t want to deepen this discussion; I’ll just subscribe to the newsletter.

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A post was split to a new topic: Automatically stop charging at defined level?

i like the idea … to have a spare part - but i would have it at home for the case my first accu dies away…

But in that case I would not buy it before the first battery shows at least a sign of degeneration/weakening.
Otherwise your spare battery is the same age as your first one.
And I have not heard of or experienced the sudden death of a LiIon-battery. Aside from the Samsung one’s going up in flames of course; but a spare one wouldn’t have helped in that case. :wink:
I am prepared, to learn something new of course. :slight_smile:

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There seems to be a " Coming soon" note on every spare part right now, strange. I used a phone once where I exchanged the battery to a fully charged one when required. But you always have to turn down the power properly, or some apps might lose their settings. It often happend with OsmAnd. So in general, it was more practical to me to use a powerbank.

But in a “decent” smartphone where you can exchange the battery easily, you are of course also free to to that. There will probably be “strange effects” (percentage display) when one is new and the other one is “worn out”.

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It will “wear out” after some years even when not in use and kept about half charged (recommended for storage).

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A powerbank is essentially a portable portable or mini UPS.

I also recommend the powerbank suggestion, for a myriad of reasons.

  1. The FP3 will last longer with the current battery. As an illustration, I’ve barely [though this is vague] used my FP3 past 3 days, and it is sitting on 54% right now. The need to (permanently/regularly) replace the battery with another is also lower. You should only need a second battery when your first has worn out.

  2. A powerbank usually has USB-A (with USB-C on the rise), and therefore can also be used to charge other devices.

  3. The battery is IMNSHO a bitch to replace. You don’t want to do this regularly. This is the downside of the upside of the battery fitting well with the contacts, an issue FP2 had.

  4. This way, you don’t have to power down the device if you require more juice.

One downside of a powerbank is it is heavier and requires some space + cable to attach to smartphone. That is a minor downside though.

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My bet would be, they are focussing on producing and selling phones.
For the first six months spare parts should hardly be missed, since defects will most likely be warranty cases. The parts will be sent for free and need not be purchased.
An exemption would be (bruatlly) broken displays or batteries for backup use. Those two parts therefore might be the first to be sold.

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Hmmm, thats not quite right. Here it is explained very well:

Working on the voltage level will always only give you a rough estimate.
of the state of charge. Therefore all better circuits work with
special ICs that constantly monitor the charge state. These are
and monitor over the entire battery life of the battery.
The voltage and current that flows in and out. This
Chips can then be read out via I2C, SPI or any other interface.
to obtain the desired information.
(translated from German by an automatic translater, just cause I am lazy :upside_down_face: )

So the health status of modern Li-Ion batteries are stored to a separate chip within the battery module, which the device is reading. Therefore calibration could be needed if something went wrong by writing data on the battery IC.

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My request seems to have spawned quite the discussion.

I use the FP3 for navigation while cycling, professionally as well as on overnight tours.
While navigating, the battery doesn’t hold for a whole day. The vibrations while cycling will destroy the USB-sockets of powerbanks and phones in the long run, I tested that thoroughly and costly.

I’ve owned several powerbanks and destroyed most of them while cycling. Now I own a 20Ah one, and want to keep it as long as possible.

I also live in a pretty rainy part of the world. I’ll keep the phone in the rain in a bag similiar to the Ortlieb SafeIts; a powerbank won’t fit into that.

That modern smartphones learn the discharge characteristics of a given battery is correct. I’ve found that a great way to prevent errornous charge display is to use two batteries of similar age and exchange them frequently.

And my dexterity is definitifely not above average, but it’s pretty easy to replace the battery of a FP3. If you’re not able to do that easily, you should let a doctor check your coordination.

In my situation a power bank is not “a better idea”, and the attached cable is not “a minor downside”. Don’t be condescending.

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My request seems to have spawned quite the discussion.

Yes, it is a public discussion, where everyone can contribute to the discussion. Not a personal topic involving only advice for one person, or only one person’s use-case.

The vibrations while cycling will destroy the USB-sockets of powerbanks and phones in the long run, I tested that thoroughly and costly.

Did you test this with USB-C? On Fairphone 3, or other smartphones? Did you verify the Fairphone 3 lacks juice for your use-case?

I also live in a pretty rainy part of the world. I’ll keep the phone in the rain in a bag similiar to the Ortlieb SafeIts; a powerbank won’t fit into that.

True, however perhaps a small hole for the cable would work, or a bag which includes the powerbank.

And my dexterity is definitifely not above average, but it’s pretty easy to replace the battery of a FP3. If you’re not able to do that easily, you should let a doctor check your coordination.

I don’t doubt the dexterity of a (professional) cyclist.

I don’t have to let a doctor check my coordination, I already know it isn’t that good. The problem is the combination of required force plus not wanting to damage the phone. My partner had the same issue, so n=2 (out of 2 from my observations). You don’t have to agree with that.

In my situation a power bank is not “a better idea”, and the attached cable is not “a minor downside”.

My advice counts for general usage; not specific use cases.

I wasn’t able to take the battery out of the phone and my wife neither with only fingers. I used a small flat screwdriver to do it. I understood from the forum we are many in this case and I would be surprised it is explained by a lack of dexterity or are FP3 users under average in terms of coordination? :wink:

when i got my FP3 newly i had no problem to remove the battery to insert my Sim-cards…

as it also should hold and have contact (and not swim around in the mobile) i am aware of tight fitting parts…
no problem for me :wink:

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